New rendering testing

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New rendering testing

jim hurley
i have been experimenting with the new rendering tools in 5.0

Here is a stack that allows you to experiment for yourselves. Run this in the message box.

   go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/SimpleMotion.livecode"

It doen't appear that 5.0 is that different from 4.6 when the graphic demands are simple. But for multiple moving objects, there is clearly an advantage to 5.0

I have also post a stack illustrating a number of graphic functions on the User Samples section of the LiveCode application. These all work reasonably well in 4.6 and 5.0 They may also be downloaded by typing this in the Message Box:

     go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/ProgrammableGraphics.livecode"

Render unto 5.0 that which is complex and
render unto 4.6 that which is simpler.

Jim Hurley
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Re: New rendering testing

René Micout
Thank you James !!
René

Le 16 oct. 2011 à 22:08, James Hurley a écrit :

> i have been experimenting with the new rendering tools in 5.0
>
> Here is a stack that allows you to experiment for yourselves. Run this in the message box.
>
>   go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/SimpleMotion.livecode"
>
> It doen't appear that 5.0 is that different from 4.6 when the graphic demands are simple. But for multiple moving objects, there is clearly an advantage to 5.0
>
> I have also post a stack illustrating a number of graphic functions on the User Samples section of the LiveCode application. These all work reasonably well in 4.6 and 5.0 They may also be downloaded by typing this in the Message Box:
>
>     go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/ProgrammableGraphics.livecode"
>
> Render unto 5.0 that which is complex and
> render unto 4.6 that which is simpler.
>
> Jim Hurley
> _______________________________________________
> use-livecode mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode


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Re: New rendering testing

Alejandro Tejada
In reply to this post by jim hurley
Great work, Jim! :-D

After running these demos, finally I understand how
useful could be for young minds, to use and learn
Turtle Graphics.

I downloaded your book from:
www.jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/TurtlePhysics%20Text.doc
and noticed that when I open the file
in Open Office or WordPad, some characters are
replaced by the question mark:

3. Functions: direction(?,?) and distance(?,?).

By any chance, Did you write this document in
a Macintosh and character conversion is changing
the original text?

If possible, I would like that you point me to some
studies that details the learning experience (for teachers
and students) of using Turtle Graphics in the classroom.

Thanks again for sharing your groundbreaking work!

Al
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Re: New rendering testing

Joe Lewis Wilkins
Alejandro:

Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I vaguely recall having read/studied something re "Turtle-Graphics" many years ago, so maybe it is time for  refresher - even for us old students. (Smile)

Though I've not commented on any of your many contributions to the list, rest assured that I am as beholden to you as those who have. My needs are just more modest.

Enjoy your fine weather this time of the year.

Joe Wilkins
Architect

On Oct 17, 2011, at 7:02 AM, Alejandro Tejada wrote:

> Great work, Jim! :-D
>
> After running these demos, finally I understand how
> useful could be for young minds, to use and learn
> Turtle Graphics.
>
> I downloaded your book from:
> www.jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/TurtlePhysics%20Text.doc
> and noticed that when I open the file
> in Open Office or WordPad, some characters are
> replaced by the question mark:
>
> 3. Functions: direction(?,?) and distance(?,?).
>
> By any chance, Did you write this document in
> a Macintosh and character conversion is changing
> the original text?
>
> If possible, I would like that you point me to some
> studies that details the learning experience (for teachers
> and students) of using Turtle Graphics in the classroom.
>
> Thanks again for sharing your groundbreaking work!
>
> Al

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Re: New rendering testing

jim hurley
In reply to this post by jim hurley
Al,

This all started while was teaching at the university and working with a local grade school teacher. At that time Logo was all the rage and I thought it would be an ideal language in which young children might solve interesting physics problems, essentially implement numerical methods to solve differential equations. In Turtle Graphics for example a trajectory script looks like this:

 repeat until ycor() < 0
    incXY vx,vy -- Increment the x and y coordinates by vx and vy every second
    subtract gravity from vy
 end repeat

I wrote a book titled "Logo Physics" which is now out of print but available, used, on Amazon. (I was proud to see just now that one vender has for sale at $129.)

The very attractive element of Logo was what became knows as Turtle Graphics. (LOGO itself was modeled on LISP.) It was developed at MIT by Symour Papert et. al. I was talking to them at the time.

Later, I wrote a translator for TG in HyperTalk. There are several version of it at:  http://jamesphurley.com/runrev.html

There are a large number of applications there.

Kevin and I discussed the possibility of implementing it as part of Run Rev. They were more interesting in education at the time.

I'm not sure where that file you found came from, but it is not very readable. I have a clean version I will send you separately. Do not share it with others at this time. I have retitled (and did some rewriting of)  the Logo Physics book to "Programming for Science Students." I think that is the appropriate market--if one exists at all.

I still think it could be a useful component of LiveCode. In one iteration of the code, it can be used to move any RR control around the screen with FORWARD 10, LEFT 45, etc. See "Control Turtles" on the above web site.

Unfortunately I am out of touch with this market now and so have nothing for you about current applications, if any. Trouble is perception. It is perceived as a tool for children, a perception quickly dispelled in Turtle Geometry by Abelson and diSessa. The last chapter is titled: Curved Geometry and General Relativity.

Jim Hurley

>
> Message: 18
> Date: Mon, 17 Oct 2011 07:02:16 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Alejandro Tejada <[hidden email]>
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: New rendering testing
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Great work, Jim! :-D
>
> After running these demos, finally I understand how
> useful could be for young minds, to use and learn
> Turtle Graphics.
>
> I downloaded your book from:
> www.jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/TurtlePhysics%20Text.doc
> and noticed that when I open the file
> in Open Office or WordPad, some characters are
> replaced by the question mark:
>
> 3. Functions: direction(?,?) and distance(?,?).
>
> By any chance, Did you write this document in
> a Macintosh and character conversion is changing
> the original text?
>
> If possible, I would like that you point me to some
> studies that details the learning experience (for teachers
> and students) of using Turtle Graphics in the classroom.
>
> Thanks again for sharing your groundbreaking work!
>
> Al
>


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Re: New rendering testing

Alejandro Tejada
Hi Joe and Jim,

Joe, many thanks for your kind words!
I always hope that my scripting experiments
would do more good than harm and at least
should be useful to show the Do's and Don'ts
on the specific topics that I worked with.

James Hurley wrote
[snip]
Kevin and I discussed the possibility of implementing it as part of Run Rev.
They were more interesting in education at the time.
Yes, I hope to see more Livecode and LOGO teaching
in the future. In LOGO, the teacher is fundamental to
produce extraordinary results.
The greatest teaching ideas are widely celebrated and
quickly forgotten... almost like a ritual.
In my eyes, the longer I look into the Education field
this become more and more paradoxical. Almost like a
Lewis Carroll tale, with the complete cast of characters.

I am sure that Livecode is a resounding sucess when used
to teach Introduction to Computer Programming.
At least for me, this computer language provided the
confidence to try many ideas that I would not even dare to.
Yes, this computer language inspire confidence.
Does every computer language instill this
in their users/developers?

Why Livecode teaching is not more extended, as expected,
in the English speaking world? My best guess is that
everyone that look at Livecode, believe that it's a
neat idea... and their next question is:
Is this endorsed, recommended and approved by the
powers that be in education???
This is exactly the moment where you understand
that more and more people in the education field
are not, and do not pretend to be leaders, but followers...

Sad, but true...

James Hurley wrote
I'm not sure where that file you found came from, but it is not very readable.
I have a clean version I will send you separately. Do not share it with others
at this time. I have retitled (and did some rewriting of)  the Logo Physics book
to "Programming for Science Students." I think that is the appropriate market
--if one exists at all.
Received. Many Thanks! :-)

James Hurley wrote
[snip]
Unfortunately I am out of touch with this market now and so have
nothing for you about current applications, if any. Trouble is perception.
It is perceived as a tool for children, a perception quickly dispelled in
Turtle Geometry by Abelson and diSessa. The last chapter is titled:
Curved Geometry and General Relativity.
Interesting enough, in this page:
http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=7287
there is a surprising error:
Hal Abelson is Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and
Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Class of 1922!!! Extraordinary, to say the least. :-)

By the way, your stack:
http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithSpin.rev
is the only game that I play with some frecuency.

Thanks again, Jim
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Re: New rendering testing

Joe Lewis Wilkins
Alex:

When I first got involved with Revolution I had hoped that it would just be an up-todate HC; but, alas, it began to get too complicated for the average hobbyist, so many of the HC users just never came aboard. I don't blame them. I was very close to being one who didn't myself. Over the years I have done some pretty remarkable things with HC. I really neither needed nor wanted the extensions that eventually became LiveCode. I believe that a totally bug-free Revolution 1.x could have become a major hit with all of the educators, and wouldn't have had to be so costly. Do I hear a few Amens?

Joe Wilkins

On Oct 17, 2011, at 3:27 PM, Alejandro Tejada wrote:

> Hi Joe and Jim,
>
> Joe, many thanks for your kind words!
> I always hope that my scripting experiments
> would do more good than harm and at least
> should be useful to show the Do's and Don'ts
> on the specific topics that I worked with.
>
>
> James Hurley wrote:
>>
>> [snip]
>> Kevin and I discussed the possibility of implementing it as part of Run
>> Rev.
>> They were more interesting in education at the time.
>>
>
> Yes, I hope to see more Livecode and LOGO teaching
> in the future. In LOGO, the teacher is fundamental to
> produce extraordinary results.
> The greatest teaching ideas are widely celebrated and
> quickly forgotten... almost like a ritual.
> In my eyes, the longer I look into the Education field
> this become more and more paradoxical. Almost like a
> Lewis Carroll tale, with the complete cast of characters.
>
> I am sure that Livecode is a resounding sucess when used
> to teach Introduction to Computer Programming.
> At least for me, this computer language provided the
> confidence to try many ideas that I would not even dare to.
> Yes, this computer language inspire confidence.
> Does every computer language instill this
> in their users/developers?
>
> Why Livecode teaching is not more extended, as expected,
> in the English speaking world? My best guess is that
> everyone that look at Livecode, believe that it's a
> neat idea... and their next question is:
> Is this endorsed, recommended and approved by the
> powers that be in education???
> This is exactly the moment where you understand
> that more and more people in the education field
> are not, and do not pretend to be leaders, but followers...
>
> Sad, but true...
>
>
> James Hurley wrote:
>>
>> I'm not sure where that file you found came from, but it is not very
>> readable.
>> I have a clean version I will send you separately. Do not share it with
>> others
>> at this time. I have retitled (and did some rewriting of)  the Logo
>> Physics book
>> to "Programming for Science Students." I think that is the appropriate
>> market
>> --if one exists at all.
>>
>
> Received. Many Thanks! :-)
>
>
> James Hurley wrote:
>>
>> [snip]
>> Unfortunately I am out of touch with this market now and so have
>> nothing for you about current applications, if any. Trouble is perception.
>> It is perceived as a tool for children, a perception quickly dispelled in
>> Turtle Geometry by Abelson and diSessa. The last chapter is titled:
>> Curved Geometry and General Relativity.
>>
>
> Interesting enough, in this page:
> http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=7287
> there is a surprising error:
> Hal Abelson is Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and
> Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology
>
> Class of 1922!!! Extraordinary, to say the least. :-)
>
> By the way, your stack:
> http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithSpin.rev
> is the only game that I play with some frecuency.
>
> Thanks again, Jim

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Re: New rendering testing

Alejandro Tejada
Hi Joe,

Joe Lewis Wilkins wrote
When I first got involved with Revolution I had hoped
that it would just be an up-todate HC; but, alas, it
began to get too complicated for the average hobbyist,
so many of the HC users just never came aboard.
I don't blame them. I was very close to being one
who didn't myself. Over the years I have done some
pretty remarkable things with HC. I really neither needed
nor wanted the extensions that eventually became LiveCode.
I believe that a totally bug-free Revolution 1.x could have
become a major hit with all of the educators, and wouldn't
have had to be so costly. Do I hear a few Amens?
Strangely enough, I still believe that it is possible to create
amazing interactive stacks in this platform, with a clever use
of the commands show, hide, visual effects and go to card.
After all, we could use only what we need.

There are many great features of this platform that I never
have explored, but it's good to know that they are available,
if I ever need them. Hopefully, a new text field control and
a zoom property for groups will appear in a near future.

Al


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Re: New rendering testing

Joe Lewis Wilkins
Alex,

I'm sure you'll eventually take advantage of all that LC comes to offer, and they love you for your outside the box thinking and doing; but you're far more imaginative than the average "potential" LC user.

Frankly, I'd love to be in your boots. (smile)

Joe Wilkins

On Oct 17, 2011, at 4:25 PM, Alejandro Tejada wrote:

> Hi Joe,
>
>
> Joe Lewis Wilkins wrote:
>>
>> When I first got involved with Revolution I had hoped
>> that it would just be an up-todate HC; but, alas, it
>> began to get too complicated for the average hobbyist,
>> so many of the HC users just never came aboard.
>> I don't blame them. I was very close to being one
>> who didn't myself. Over the years I have done some
>> pretty remarkable things with HC. I really neither needed
>> nor wanted the extensions that eventually became LiveCode.
>> I believe that a totally bug-free Revolution 1.x could have
>> become a major hit with all of the educators, and wouldn't
>> have had to be so costly. Do I hear a few Amens?
>>
>
> Strangely enough, I still believe that it is possible to create
> amazing interactive stacks in this platform, with a clever use
> of the commands show, hide, visual effects and go to card.
> After all, we could use only what we need.
>
> There are many great features of this platform that I never
> have explored, but it's good to know that they are available,
> if I ever need them. Hopefully, a new text field control and
> a zoom property for groups will appear in a near future.
>
> Al

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Re: New rendering testing

Alejandro Tejada
In reply to this post by jim hurley
Hi Jim,

James Hurley wrote
Al,

The potential for LC in education is two-fold. One is in writing educational software and the other is LC as a programming environment.

I see the latter as more valuable, particularly for science students. FORTRAN  is for the heavy calculations where the programmer must make allowances for the computer. LC is for those problems where more consideration is given to the programmer over the computer. I remember working with a zoologist analyzing the mechanics of the running cheata. I did it in LOGO because it was faster to program and easier to obtain a graphical representation of the data. The run-time for the program was seconds.

Like you, I have found that RR has enriched my life, allowing me to work out my ideas in a program designed by me to suit that particular idea.
Yes, we are the "Inventive Users" about which Dan Shafer wrote. :-D

James Hurley wrote
Glad you enjoy Nine Ball With Spin. I confess that I may have spent only a half hour playing the game. My game was in the programming. (I'm sure that is an element for all of RRs aficionados.)  And if you are the type who is tempted to cheat at solitaire, I am, then I have a upgrade for you: Nine Ball With Projections. It  calculates where the struck ball will go, given your selected path for the cue ball, and draws that line showing the projected result. You can't miss. Not much fun unless you are failure averse.

    go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithProjections.rev"
This looks great! The yellow line actually shows the possible
trajectory of the red ball. :-D
Now I only need an Undo menu command to reset the balls
to their last position and be able to play many different shots
from the same position.

Many Thanks again for sharing this game!

Jim, keep up your landmarking work in this area.
I am sure that many physics teachers would
want to use Turtle graphics if they could learn
about it. In the place where I live, many teachers
have read about it, but no one knows how to use it
in their classroom or if it is effective or still relevant today.

Turtle graphics could benefit, greatly, of a makeover to
adapt it technical terms, examples, demostrations and
student's exercises to the environment of this century.
If you look closely, you will find around you, many people
of different ages that could provide ideas and beta testing.

Today, with so many electronic gadgets created specifically
to entertain, it should be shocking for the youngest students
to learn that these could be used for learning or "work"...

After reading about the "Gamification" of learning in revUP,
I read again all the articles written by Mark Prensky about
games and learning and I reached a different conclusion,
starting from the same data.

Right now, I borrowed one of the Pokemon's Guide to their
games and I am taking notes about their strategies and
methods to "engage" (this is the keyword: "engage") their
players to complete their games (and buy more, when available)

Al
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Re: New rendering testing

jim hurley
In reply to this post by jim hurley
Reposting with the  proper Subject:


Message: 4
Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2011 09:47:26 -0700
From: James Hurley <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: use-livecode Digest, Vol 97, Issue 37
Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Al,

The potential for LC in education is two-fold. One is in writing educational software and the other is LC as a programming environment.

I see the latter as more valuable, particularly for science students. FORTRAN  is for the heavy calculations where the programmer must make allowances for the computer. LC is for those problems where more consideration is given to the programmer over the computer. I remember working with a zoologist analyzing the mechanics of the running cheata. I did it in LOGO because it was faster to program and easier to obtain a graphical representation of the data. The run-time for the program was seconds.

Like you I have found that RR has enriched my life, allowing me to work out my ideas in a program designed by me to suit that particular idea.

Glad you enjoy Nine Ball With Spin. I confess that I may have spent only a half hour playing the game. My game was in the programming. (I'm sure that is an element for all of RRs aficionados.)  And if you are the type who is tempted to cheat at solitaire, I am, then I have a upgrade for you: Nine Ball With Projections. It  calculates where the struck ball will go, given your selected path for the cue ball, and draws that line showing the projected result. You can't miss. Not much fun unless you are failure averse.

   go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithProjections.rev"

Jim Hurley

[Alejandro wrote: ]

>
>> James Hurley wrote:
>>>
>>> [snip]
>>> Kevin and I discussed the possibility of implementing it as part of Run
>>> Rev.
>>> They were more interesting in education at the time.
>>>
>>
>> Yes, I hope to see more Livecode and LOGO teaching
>> in the future. In LOGO, the teacher is fundamental to
>> produce extraordinary results.
>> The greatest teaching ideas are widely celebrated and
>> quickly forgotten... almost like a ritual.
>> In my eyes, the longer I look into the Education field
>> this become more and more paradoxical. Almost like a
>> Lewis Carroll tale, with the complete cast of characters.
>>
>> I am sure that Livecode is a resounding sucess when used
>> to teach Introduction to Computer Programming.
>> At least for me, this computer language provided the
>> confidence to try many ideas that I would not even dare to.
>> Yes, this computer language inspire confidence.
>> Does every computer language instill this
>> in their users/developers?
>>
>> Why Livecode teaching is not more extended, as expected,
>> in the English speaking world? My best guess is that
>> everyone that look at Livecode, believe that it's a
>> neat idea... and their next question is:
>> Is this endorsed, recommended and approved by the
>> powers that be in education???
>> This is exactly the moment where you understand
>> that more and more people in the education field
>> are not, and do not pretend to be leaders, but followers...
>>
>> Sad, but true...
>>
>>
>> James Hurley wrote:
>>>
>>> I'm not sure where that file you found came from, but it is not very
>>> readable.
>>> I have a clean version I will send you separately. Do not share it with
>>> others
>>> at this time. I have retitled (and did some rewriting of)  the Logo
>>> Physics book
>>> to "Programming for Science Students." I think that is the appropriate
>>> market
>>> --if one exists at all.
>>>
>>
>> Received. Many Thanks! :-)
>>
>>
>> James Hurley wrote:
>>>
>>> [snip]
>>> Unfortunately I am out of touch with this market now and so have
>>> nothing for you about current applications, if any. Trouble is perception.
>>> It is perceived as a tool for children, a perception quickly dispelled in
>>> Turtle Geometry by Abelson and diSessa. The last chapter is titled:
>>> Curved Geometry and General Relativity.
>>>
>>
>> Interesting enough, in this page:
>> http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=7287
>> there is a surprising error:
>> Hal Abelson is Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and
>> Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology
>>
>> Class of 1922!!! Extraordinary, to say the least. :-)
>>
>> By the way, your stack:
>> http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithSpin.rev
>> is the only game that I play with some frecuency.
>>
>> Thanks again, Jim
>>
>> --
>> View this message in context: http://runtime-revolution.278305.n4.nabble.com/New-rendering-testing-tp3910362p3913611.html
>> Sent from the Revolution - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
>>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> use-livecode mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
>
> End of use-livecode Digest, Vol 97, Issue 38
> ********************************************


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Re: New rendering testing

Colin Holgate-2
It doesn't do very much, it gets stuck at line 47 quickly:

    put asin(sinGamma) into gamma


On Oct 18, 2011, at 2:49 PM, James Hurley wrote:

>   go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithProjections.rev"

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Re: New rendering testing

Alejandro Tejada
Hi Colin,

Colin Holgate-2 wrote
It doesn't do very much, it gets stuck at line 47 quickly:

    put asin(sinGamma) into gamma
It works on one part of my side of the computing world. :-D
Windows XP, RevMedia 4.00
but in Stackrunner 2.0, it reports:
Executing at 3:45:28 PM on Tuesday, October 18, 2011
Type: asin: domain error
Object: stack "D:/PDF/Revolution Media 4.0.0/NineBallWithProjections.rev"
Line: put asin(sinGamma) into gamma
Line Num: 47
Hint: theCollPt

Al
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Re: New rendering testing

jim hurley
In reply to this post by jim hurley
Hi Al,


On Oct 18, 2011, at  11:54 AM, Alejandro Tejada wrote:

> Hi Jim,
>
> James Hurley wrote:
>>
>> Al,
>>
>> The potential for LC in education is two-fold. One is in writing
>> educational software and the other is LC as a programming environment.
>>
>> I see the latter as more valuable, particularly for science students.
>> FORTRAN  is for the heavy calculations where the programmer must make
>> allowances for the computer. LC is for those problems where more
>> consideration is given to the programmer over the computer. I remember
>> working with a zoologist analyzing the mechanics of the running cheata. I
>> did it in LOGO because it was faster to program and easier to obtain a
>> graphical representation of the data. The run-time for the program was
>> seconds.
>>
>> Like you, I have found that RR has enriched my life, allowing me to work
>> out my ideas in a program designed by me to suit that particular idea.
>>
>
> Yes, we are the "Inventive Users" about which Dan Shafer wrote. :-D
>
>
> James Hurley wrote:
>>
>> Glad you enjoy Nine Ball With Spin. I confess that I may have spent only a
>> half hour playing the game. My game was in the programming. (I'm sure that
>> is an element for all of RRs aficionados.)  And if you are the type who is
>> tempted to cheat at solitaire, I am, then I have a upgrade for you: Nine
>> Ball With Projections. It  calculates where the struck ball will go, given
>> your selected path for the cue ball, and draws that line showing the
>> projected result. You can't miss. Not much fun unless you are failure
>> averse.
>>
>>   go url
>> "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithProjections.rev"
>>
>
> This looks great! The yellow line actually shows the possible
> trajectory of the red ball. :-D
> Now I only need an Undo menu command to reset the balls
> to their last position and be able to play many different shots
> from the same position.

Here is an undo version. (I'm pretty sure someone else also did this a while back.)

  go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithReset.livecode"

The ultimate game would be one that plays itself. The dynamics of pool is deterministic.
One could program a game to play flawlessly all by itself. Love determinism. So predictable.
Quantum mechanics is a pain in the ass.


>
> Many Thanks again for sharing this game!
>
> Jim, keep up your landmarking work in this area.
> I am sure that many physics teachers would
> want to use Turtle graphics if they could learn
> about it. In the place where I live, many teachers
> have read about it, but no one knows how to use it
> in their classroom or if it is effective or still relevant today.
>
> Turtle graphics could benefit, greatly, of a makeover to
> adapt it technical terms, examples, demostrations and
> student's exercises to the environment of this century.
> If you look closely, you will find around you, many people
> of different ages that could provide ideas and beta testing.

My cup already runneth over. I'm 80 years old now, but still manage to keep busy.

Only my memory is shot. But there are advantages to that as well. There is a lot I won't mind losing track of.

>
> Today, with so many electronic gadgets created specifically
> to entertain, it should be shocking for the youngest students
> to learn that these could be used for learning or "work"...
>
> After reading about the "Gamification" of learning in revUP,
> I read again all the articles written by Mark Prensky about
> games and learning and I reached a different conclusion,
> starting from the same data.
>
> Right now, I borrowed one of the Pokemon's Guide to their
> games and I am taking notes about their strategies and
> methods to "engage" (this is the keyword: "engage") their
> players to complete their games (and buy more, when available)

Sounds like you lead a busy life. Busy is fun.

Jim


>
> Al


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Re: New rendering testing

jim hurley
In reply to this post by jim hurley
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2011 15:28:04 -0400
> From: Colin Holgate <[hidden email]>
> To: How to use LiveCode <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: New rendering testing
> Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> It doesn't do very much, it gets stuck at line 47 quickly:
>
>    put asin(sinGamma) into gamma
>
>
> On Oct 18, 2011, at 2:49 PM, James Hurley wrote:
>
>>  go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithProjections.rev"
>
>

Colin,

There is a quirk in Mac OS.  It shows a value of the sinGamma of 1 and yet reports a domain error for asin(sinGamma).  (The hypotenuse must be greater than or equal to either of the other two sides.) Not on the PC however as reported by Alejandro.

Two work arounds:

put trunc(100000000000000*sinGamma)/100000000000000 into sinGamma
  if abs(sinGamma) >1 then
    choose the browse tool
    return ""
  else
    put asin(sinGamma) into gamma
  end if

That gets rid of the possible round up error and cuts off any digits after the 14th decimal place.

Or:

Just replace the > operator with >= . Apparently this operator is not so sensitive as the asin operator.

  if abs(sinGamma) > 1 then -- Change this to >= 1
    choose the browse tool
    return ""
  else
    put asin(sinGamma) into gamma
  end if

There are other quirks as well but not worth fixing. It is no longer a game since the element of chance is gone.

Jim Hurley
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Re: New rendering testing

Alejandro Tejada
In reply to this post by jim hurley
Hi Jim,

James Hurley wrote
Here is an undo version. (I'm pretty sure someone else also did this a while back.)
go url "http://jamesphurley.com/jhurleyFolder/NineBallWithReset.livecode"
The ultimate game would be one that plays itself. The dynamics of pool is deterministic.
One could program a game to play flawlessly all by itself. Love determinism. So predictable.
Quantum mechanics is a pain in the ass.
This new version (with a reset button) would be my favorite version! :-D
Now I could try many different shots and, eventually, become
a better player.

But, it's possible at all to create a Pool game that play flawlessly by itself?
I am not so sure... In fact, Does anyone have seen this?
I mean, not a "fixed" or pre-programmed game, where all the balls run
to a position over the table, where the cue ball could sink them
following their numeric order without any obstacle.

James Hurley wrote
My cup already runneth over. I'm 80 years old now, but still manage to keep busy.
Only my memory is shot. But there are advantages to that as well.
There is a lot I won't mind losing track of.
Well, your activity in this platform suggest that your
mental age is several decades younger.
Your generation is a witness of the rising of
the modern world. Hopefully, all your wisdoms
and insights will be available in the future for
those who want to learn from them.

James Hurley wrote
Sounds like you lead a busy life. Busy is fun.
Yes. That's in the only way to keep going
in these extraordinary days... :-)

Al
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Re: New rendering testing

Richard Gaskin
Alejandro Tejada wrote:

> James Hurley wrote:
>>
>> My cup already runneth over. I'm 80 years old now, but still manage to
>> keep busy.
>> Only my memory is shot. But there are advantages to that as well.
>> There is a lot I won't mind losing track of.
>>
>
> Well, your activity in this platform suggest that your
> mental age is several decades younger.
> Your generation is a witness of the rising of
> the modern world. Hopefully, all your wisdoms
> and insights will be available in the future for
> those who want to learn from them.

Indeed it has:

For as long as I've been working with xTalks, most of the cool stuff any
of us writes that involves math has been influenced if not written by
Mr. Hurley.

 From HyperCard and SuperCard to LiveCode, Hurley's influence has been
felt far and wide.

He is a math god, and more than that one of the best teachers I've ever
known, able to not just possess valuable knowledge but also has the gift
of being able to transfer that knowledge to others.

Damn, if he was my high school physics teacher I'd probably be working
at NASA today.

He may get mad at me for writing this because he's also one of the more
humble souls I've come across.  But it's the plain truth, as anyone here
who's used his code will attest.

Thankfully, he lives a couple thousand miles from me so he can't come
over here to punch me for my comments. :)

So I stand by them, with a career's worth of gratitude.

One of the very best moments I've ever had at a conference was at
RevLive in Vegas when Jim showed me his rainbow simulator.  Ultra-cool
stuff, as is just about everything he turns out.

--
  Richard Gaskin
  Fourth World
  LiveCode training and consulting: http://www.fourthworld.com
  Webzine for LiveCode developers: http://www.LiveCodeJournal.com
  LiveCode Journal blog: http://LiveCodejournal.com/blog.irv

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Re: New rendering testing

Ken Ray

On Oct 19, 2011, at 11:00 AM, Richard Gaskin wrote:

> Alejandro Tejada wrote:
>
>> James Hurley wrote:
>>>
>>> My cup already runneth over. I'm 80 years old now, but still manage to
>>> keep busy.
>>> Only my memory is shot. But there are advantages to that as well.
>>> There is a lot I won't mind losing track of.
>>>
>>
>> Well, your activity in this platform suggest that your
>> mental age is several decades younger.
>> Your generation is a witness of the rising of
>> the modern world. Hopefully, all your wisdoms
>> and insights will be available in the future for
>> those who want to learn from them.
>
> Indeed it has:
>
> For as long as I've been working with xTalks, most of the cool stuff any of us writes that involves math has been influenced if not written by Mr. Hurley.
>
> From HyperCard and SuperCard to LiveCode, Hurley's influence has been felt far and wide.

Amen, brother! Without his help, Stykz would never have been made… thanks again, Jim!


Ken Ray
Sons of Thunder Software, Inc.
Email: [hidden email]
Web Site: http://www.sonsothunder.com/       

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Re: New rendering testing

Alejandro Tejada
In reply to this post by Richard Gaskin
Hi Jim,

Richard Gaskin wrote
One of the very best moments I've ever had at a conference was at
RevLive in Vegas when Jim showed me his rainbow simulator.  Ultra-cool
stuff, as is just about everything he turns out.
Then this rainbow simulator stack is a must-see,
but I could not find it in your page:
http://www.jamesphurley.com/runrev.html

By the way, Jim, it's good idea to test your stacks
using Ken Ray's StackRunner 2.0
http://www.sonsothunder.com/devres/revolution/downloads/StackRunner.htm

If all of them run fine, add the download direction
of StackRunner to your page, after this line:

These stacks all presume that you have a copy of the application
Runtime Revolution. You will find an evaluation edition at
http://www.runrev.com/home/product-family/

Keep Up your groundbreaking work!

Al