Revolution vs Visual Basic

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Revolution vs Visual Basic

Haitham Abdulla
Hi,



May I take few minutes please?



When Revolution with some programming languages such as C++ and Java, it is
clear that designing and creating applications (or whatever) using
Revolution is much easier than those programming languages. But what is your
opinion when comparing it with Visual Basic .NET or Visual Basic 2005
Express?



Visual Basic .NET has many features similar to those in Revolution. It is
very easy to design forms and interfaces. There are many components that you
can drag and drop into your forms. VB .NET has a very clear and readable
syntax. It has strong debugging tools. And much more.



Question (1):

Are there some strong features in Revolution that could make it better than
VB .NET. Would you please list the features for me?



Question (2):

VB .NET has some great built-in components and I want to ask whether
Revolution has them. Some of those components are:

a.      Font Dialog Box

b.     Color Dialog Box

c.     Save Dialog Box

d.     Print Dialog Box



Question (3):

VB .NET has the Tree Component which makes you able to build something
similar to the trees of folders and files in Windows Explorer. It is very
easy to use and you can expand and add items into the tree dynamically. Is
there something similar in Revolution? Is it easy to do such thing?



Question (4):

We can build easily a Tool Bar in VB .NET and add icons in the Tool Bar. We
can also easily draw pictures for the icons within VB .NET or we can attach
any saved pictures to the icons.

Is there something similar in Revolution? Is it easy to do so?



Question (5):

We, as programmers, used to use some techniques and algorithms in our
programs. Sometimes we need to use Stacks, Queues, Hash Tables,
Dictionaries, etc. All these objects, or most of them, are built in VB .NET
and we can use them easily.

Does Revolution have these objects?

Or can we define or create something similar?



Question (6):

When we want to produce the program (or application) that is created by
Revolution, we can produce it as EXE file (in windows). But what if we need
to make some kind of Installation or Setup? Can we do it?

What about if the users want to uninstall our program (or software)? Can
they?



Sorry for bothering





Regards,
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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

masmit
Haitham, I can't answer anything like all your questions, but I'll  
have a go at what I can:

On 6 Mar 2006, at 06:43, Haitham Abdulla wrote:

>
> Question (2):
>
> VB .NET has some great built-in components and I want to ask whether
> Revolution has them. Some of those components are:
>
> a.      Font Dialog Box
    no, but I think something may be available from someone on this  
list.
>
> b.     Color Dialog Box
    yes

> c.     Save Dialog Box
    yes
>
> d.     Print Dialog Box
    yes

>
>
>
> Question (3):
>
> VB .NET has the Tree Component which makes you able to build something
> similar to the trees of folders and files in Windows Explorer. It  
> is very
> easy to use and you can expand and add items into the tree  
> dynamically. Is
> there something similar in Revolution? Is it easy to do such thing?
Not built in, but I think there are a couple of tree view components  
from users of this list

> Question (4):
>
> We can build easily a Tool Bar in VB .NET and add icons in the Tool  
> Bar. We
> can also easily draw pictures for the icons within VB .NET or we  
> can attach
> any saved pictures to the icons.
>
> Is there something similar in Revolution? Is it easy to do so?
>
If you mean a row of buttons with custom icons, extremely easy
>
> Question (5):
>
> We, as programmers, used to use some techniques and algorithms in our
> programs. Sometimes we need to use Stacks, Queues, Hash Tables,
> Dictionaries, etc. All these objects, or most of them, are built in  
> VB .NET
> and we can use them easily.

not really, but a lot of the power in Revolution is in it's chunk  
expressions, and many different kinds of structures can be easily  
made and used.
Important to know is that in Revolution, effectively everything is a  
string, there are no types. This is both a disadvantage and a huge  
advantage.
A little out of my depth in saying this, but I don't think Revolution  
would be optimal for writing large and complex image manipulation  
routines, for example.

I'll leave it there, as I have no experience of VB, so perhaps others  
can offer useful comparisons.

Best

Mark
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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

mikey-2
> Important to know is that in Revolution, effectively everything is a
> string, there are no types. This is both a disadvantage and a huge
> advantage.

This is misleading.  Variables in all xtalk languages are not
strongly-typed.  They are not strings, longints, reals, booleans, or
anything else.  As programmers people frequently think of untyped
variables as strings simply because it is the type that is most
commonly used in all programming.  However, since variables are
untyped, it is possible to take pi, for instance, and in one statement
use it in a mathematical expression:

put pi*diameter into circumference

And then on the very next line use it as a string:

answer "The circumference is:"&&circumference


While one of the real strengths of xtalk languages is that they have
very strong string manipulation routines through chunk expressions,
that does not make variables in an xtalk language a string.  The
difference may seem subtle, but it is important - there is no need to
cast a variable when it is used in different contexts.
--
On the first day, God created the heavens and the Earth
On the second day, God created the oceans.
On the third day, God put the animals on hold for a few hours,
   and did a little diving.
And God said, "This is good."
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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Bob Warren-3
In reply to this post by Haitham Abdulla
Haitham/Mark wrote:

 >Question (3):
 >>
 >> VB .NET has the Tree Component which makes you able to build something
 >> similar to the trees of folders and files in Windows Explorer. It
 >> is very
 >> easy to use and you can expand and add items into the tree
 >> dynamically. Is
 >> there something similar in Revolution? Is it easy to do such thing?

 >Not built in, but I think there are a couple of tree view components
 >from users of this list

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Haitham:

Please visit the following webpage for details of file/picture chooser
widgets written in Rev:

http://www.howsoft.com/runrev/stacks.htm

These widgets do, of course, include HD trees.

The standalone widgets exist for Windows XP/2000 and Ubuntu Linux. In
view of the fact that I do not possess sufficient machines for testing
versions for MAC and other flavours of Linux, I intend to release the
source stacks so that other developers can make the adaptions for these
platforms. I shall be releasing the stacks within the next few days.

What this means for you personally, apart from using the widgets as they
stand, is that you can adapt the HD treeviews as you want.

I don't know whether or not other programmers would find it easy or
difficult to produce HD treeviews in Rev. The fact is, that so far they
don't seem to have done it very much. Certainly, for me, the development
of these stacks was non-trivial to say the least. (On the other hand, it
was my first real attempt at producing an application in Rev. In actual
fact, I did it in VB6 first, and then "translated" it into Transcript.)

I believe that one other programmer has produced a treeview widget
fairly recently (but NOT for the HD), which you can add to or subtract
from. If you look back on the Use-Rev Lists, you are sure to find it

Regards,
Bob Warren

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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Garrett Hylltun-2
In reply to this post by masmit
Mark Smith wrote:

> Haitham, I can't answer anything like all your questions, but I'll have
> a go at what I can:
>
> On 6 Mar 2006, at 06:43, Haitham Abdulla wrote:
>
>>
>> Question (2):
>>
>> VB .NET has some great built-in components and I want to ask whether
>> Revolution has them. Some of those components are:
>>
>> a.      Font Dialog Box
>    no, but I think something may be available from someone on this list.

The following will at least get a list of ANSI fonts and sort them in
alphabetical order for you:

put fontNames() into varTempPreProcess
put the number of lines of varTempPreProcess into varTemp
put 1 into varCounter
repeat varTemp times
   put line varCounter of varTempPreProcess into varTempFont
   if the fontLanguage of varTempFont is "ANSI" then
     put varTempFont & return after varFontMenuBuild
   end if
   put varCounter + 1 into varCounter
end repeat
sort lines of varFontMenuBuild


the variable "varFontMenuBuild" now holds the sorted list of fonts.
 From there you can either make your own font dialog, or maybe a menu.

There are probably other ways of doing this, but this is what I have.
I've only been using Rev since late 2005, so I'm not an old pro at it
yet like so many others here.  ;-)

-Garrett
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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Ken Ray
On 3/8/06 12:28 PM, "Garrett Hylltun" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> put fontNames() into varTempPreProcess
> put the number of lines of varTempPreProcess into varTemp
> put 1 into varCounter
> repeat varTemp times
>    put line varCounter of varTempPreProcess into varTempFont
>    if the fontLanguage of varTempFont is "ANSI" then
>      put varTempFont & return after varFontMenuBuild
>    end if
>    put varCounter + 1 into varCounter
> end repeat
> sort lines of varFontMenuBuild

This could be shortened thusly:

  put "" into varFontMenuBuild
  repeat for each line varTempFont in fontNames()
    if the fontLanguage of varTempFont = "ANSI" then put varTempFont & \
      CR after varFontMenuBuild
  end repeat
  delete char -1 of varFontMenuBuild  -- remove trailing CR
  sort lines of varFontMenuBuild

Just curious... any particular reason you need just the ANSI font names if
the list of fonts returned by fontNames() is what's installed in the
computer?

If not, then it's even easier:

  put fontNames() into varFontMenuBuild
  sort lines of varFontMenuBuild
 

Ken Ray
Sons of Thunder Software
Web site: http://www.sonsothunder.com/
Email: [hidden email]

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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Dan Shafer-2
In reply to this post by Haitham Abdulla
Haltham.....

(Keep in mind as you read this that although I'm a language junkie and I've
done a bit of work in VB, though not recently, I'm really a Mac guy so some
other Windows developers here may very well declare me to be all wet. I
would bow to their judgement.)

Revolution's largest claim to fame is clearly that it allows the creation of
cross-platform standlone applications from a single development platform. If
that's an important factor for you, then obviously VB variants aren't going
to be the answer because you cannot create OS X or Linux/Unix apps from it.
If, however, you are purely a Windows developer and if you're already
steeped in VB syntax, methodologies and architecture, then my guess is
you'll find yourself well-served in the long run by staying with VB.

A lot of what you are looking for in Rev isn't built in but as others have
shown in their answers here, creating the functionality in Rev is close to
trivial. But the programming paradigm in Revolution with its Transcript
xTalk language is so substantially different from the approaches taken by VB
that twisting your head around it may prove challenging. That challenge is
definitely worthwhile if you plan to create cross-platform software but if
you don't, I'm not sure it's worth it.


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dan Shafer, Information Product Consultant and Author
http://www.shafermedia.com
Get my book, "Revolution: Software at the Speed of Thought"
>From http://www.shafermediastore.com/tech_main.html
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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Stephen Barncard
On the other hand, many of us here have toiled with other languages
for years, but found Transcript the most natural of all - you can
literally 'think' the routines and write them.

At 10:56 -0800 3/8/06, Dan Shafer wrote:

>Haltham.....
>that twisting your head around it may prove challenging. That challenge is
>definitely worthwhile if you plan to create cross-platform software but if
>you don't, I'm not sure it's worth it.
>

--
stephen barncard
s a n  f r a n c i s c o
- - -  - - - - - - - - -
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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Andre Garzia
In reply to this post by Dan Shafer-2
Haltham,

another nice features of Rev that I don't find in the standard  
computer languages out there are:

* Avoid the write-compile-debug cycle. Your stack is always ready,  
your code too. Just change the tool and interact with it. If it  
explodes, change the tool and fix it. This might appear silly at  
first glance but this is one huge time saver. Using tradicional  
languages you might end up building tons of buggy standalones as you  
debug your app. With Rev things are just more productive. For  
example, Rob had this huge 90mb stack that took some minutes to  
build. If he had to build it everytime he wanted to test something,  
he'd end up loosing time...

* Its easy to create custom tools to help you code. As you get more  
used to us and this list, you'll see that many developers end up  
building their own palletes and environment to suit their tastes.  
It's not like ActiveX and VCL controls of windows. It's like simple  
tools built with Rev to help you work the way you want to work. Scott  
Rossi for example built some very nice alignment, gradient and color  
tools to suit his taste. I have my own set of network tools. I never  
saw VB developers building such tools as easy as we do here.

* Revolution is fun and powerfull. Revolution has some 'new' concepts  
that tradicional coders might need to learn such as how stack works,  
the message path, all about custom properties and other features. But  
those features enable you to create very powerfull tools very fast.  
The stacks being able to load and use other stacks across networks  
make it very easy to share code and to work in groups, it also enable  
you to create auto-update tools very easily. The message path that  
allows you to dispatch and listen to messages making your code flow  
in ways that C/C++ coders can't do and Custom Properties, your cool  
way to store all kinds of things. I've seen pdfs, fonts, all packed  
inside little props of buttons ready to being unpacked as needed or  
copied to other stacks, it's not like other languages containers.  
Custom Props are a way to tune an object to your tastes and allied to  
the message path system allows you to build beautiful softwares that  
are really easy to understand and mantain (which is always productive  
wise).

* Oh, did we talked about cross platform yet? :-)

Cheers and welcome
Andre

On Mar 8, 2006, at 3:56 PM, Dan Shafer wrote:

> Haltham.....
>
> (Keep in mind as you read this that although I'm a language junkie  
> and I've
> done a bit of work in VB, though not recently, I'm really a Mac guy  
> so some
> other Windows developers here may very well declare me to be all  
> wet. I
> would bow to their judgement.)
>
> Revolution's largest claim to fame is clearly that it allows the  
> creation of
> cross-platform standlone applications from a single development  
> platform. If
> that's an important factor for you, then obviously VB variants  
> aren't going
> to be the answer because you cannot create OS X or Linux/Unix apps  
> from it.
> If, however, you are purely a Windows developer and if you're already
> steeped in VB syntax, methodologies and architecture, then my guess is
> you'll find yourself well-served in the long run by staying with VB.
>
> A lot of what you are looking for in Rev isn't built in but as  
> others have
> shown in their answers here, creating the functionality in Rev is  
> close to
> trivial. But the programming paradigm in Revolution with its  
> Transcript
> xTalk language is so substantially different from the approaches  
> taken by VB
> that twisting your head around it may prove challenging. That  
> challenge is
> definitely worthwhile if you plan to create cross-platform software  
> but if
> you don't, I'm not sure it's worth it.
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Dan Shafer, Information Product Consultant and Author
> http://www.shafermedia.com
> Get my book, "Revolution: Software at the Speed of Thought"
>> From http://www.shafermediastore.com/tech_main.html
> _______________________________________________
> use-revolution mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your  
> subscription preferences:
> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-revolution

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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Garrett Hylltun-2
In reply to this post by Ken Ray
Ken Ray wrote:

[snip]

> Just curious... any particular reason you need just the ANSI font names if
> the list of fonts returned by fontNames() is what's installed in the
> computer?
>
> If not, then it's even easier:
>
>   put fontNames() into varFontMenuBuild
>   sort lines of varFontMenuBuild

I would end up with font names that I believe are in unicode characters
and did not display well in Rev.  And I do not know how to resolve that
at this time  :-(

Example:

Geneva CE
Monaco CE
Times CE
Helvetica CE
Courier CE
ÉqÉâÉMÉmäpÉS Pro W6
ÉqÉâÉMÉmäpÉS Pro W3
ÉqÉâÉMÉmä€ÉS Pro W4
ÉqÉâÉMÉmñæí© Pro W6
ÉqÉâÉMÉmñæí© Pro W3
ª™Œƒœ???
ÉqÉâÉMÉmäpÉS Std W8
Geeza Pro Bold
Lucida Grande CE

Lines 6 through 12 show as characters above the 159 character range and
are not readable on my English setup here.  I assume that the fonts on
those lines are unicode.

-Garrett
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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

mikey-2
In reply to this post by Dan Shafer-2
> A lot of what you are looking for in Rev isn't built in but as others have
> shown in their answers here, creating the functionality in Rev is close to
> trivial. But the programming paradigm in Revolution with its Transcript
> xTalk language is so substantially different from the approaches taken by VB
> that twisting your head around it may prove challenging. That challenge is
> definitely worthwhile if you plan to create cross-platform software but if
> you don't, I'm not sure it's worth it.

I would tend to agree with and disagree with this statement at the
same time.  On the one hand, one of the things that is really great
about all of the HC derrivatives is that you have access to, and can
change, almost anything you want at any time.  It makes customizing
the environment or adding onto it easy, and dare I say, fun.

I would disagree with the statement aht the language is so different
that wrapping your head around it can be challenging, and might not be
worth it.  The advantage that Transcript and all xTalk languages have
is that the paradigm is really trivial BECAUSE it is so different than
most modern languages - it is, IMHO, more natural, and therefore
easier to learn.  The language itself is conversational, so the syntax
is very similar to English grammar, the vocabulary is nearly obvious
set the color of me to blue
get the rect of me
put item 3 of theList into address

Revolution's grandfather, HyperCard made the task of building
prototypes a trivial enterprise.  Revolution is also easy to use to
build prototypes.  The overhead that is usually associated with
building a project is for the most part abssent.  You don't have to
cast and instantiate anything.  Types are context-implied (see my
previous example).  In short it is REALLY easy to build something
quickly.

Transcript's ability to parse strings (and make the code required to
parse strings) means that one of the most onerous tasks in computing
is very easy to achieve with minimal effort.  In development studies,
the two most common problems that programmers face are parsing and
communication (either between projects, devices, or programs).  All of
these functions are straghtforward and simple.

I would rate Revolution's learning curve (to the point where you can
be productive) as low-medium.  Once you understand things like
"inheritence path" and the basic grammar you should be able to pick up
RR in no time.
--
On the first day, God created the heavens and the Earth
On the second day, God created the oceans.
On the third day, God put the animals on hold for a few hours,
   and did a little diving.
And God said, "This is good."
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Font Dialog Box (was: Revolution vs Visual Basic)

Chipp Walters
In reply to this post by Haitham Abdulla
Haitham (and others):

While there is not Font Dialog Box, it took me only 5 minutes to create one.

You can too. It's easy.

Create a stack called "fontTest", then create a subStack called
"answerFont". Stack "answerFont" will be the dialog box. Stack
"fontTest" is the stack from which it will be called.

Create a  button named "Pick a Font" on stack "fontTest" and set the
script of it to:

on mouseUp

   --> LOADS 'answerFont' INTO MEMORY
   start using stack "answerFont"

   --> CALLS THE answerFont FUNCTION FROM STACK "answerFont"
   put answerFont() into tFont

   --> UNLOADS STACK "answerFont"
   stop using stack "answerFont"

   --> CHECKS TO SEE IF A FONT WAS RETURNED
   if tFont is "" then exit to top

   --> DISPLAY THE FONT RETURNED
   answer tFont
end mouseUp

Then on the "answerFont" substack, add a single list field named
"theFonts" and a "Cancel" and "OK" button.

Script of Cancel Button:

on mouseUp
   set the dialogData to ""
   close this stack
end mouseUp

Script of OK button:

on mouseUp
   put the hilitedLines of fld "theFonts" into tLineNum
   if tLineNum is empty then
     beep
     answer information "Please choose a font!"
     exit mouseUp
   end if
   set the dialogData to line tLineNum of fld "theFonts"
   close this stack
end mouseUp

Script of the "answerFont" stack:

function answerFont
   modal stack "answerFont"
   return the dialogData
end answerFont

on openStack
   put the fontNames into tFontList
   sort tFontList
   put tFontList into fld "theFonts"
end openStack

That's all there is to it! And that's why it's not necessary to have a
Font Dialog Box as it can be created in just a few minutes! :-)

This font dialog box is very portable and can be used in any project.
All you have to do is copy the subStack "answerFont" to your mainStack
and then insert the following code whenever you want your user to choose
a font (for instance a choose font button):

on mouseUp
   start using stack "answerFont"
   put answerFont() into tFont
   stop using stack "answerFont"

   --> DO SOMETHING WITH tFont HERE
end mouseUp

-Chipp


Haitham Abdulla wrote:


> VB .NET has some great built-in components and I want to ask whether
> Revolution has them. Some of those components are:
>
> a.      Font Dialog Box
>
> b.     Color Dialog Box
>
> c.     Save Dialog Box
>
> d.     Print Dialog Box


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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Devin Asay
In reply to this post by Garrett Hylltun-2

On Mar 8, 2006, at 12:35 PM, Garrett Hylltun wrote:

> <snip>

> I would end up with font names that I believe are in unicode  
> characters and did not display well in Rev.  And I do not know how  
> to resolve that at this time  :-(
>
> Example:
>
> Geneva CE
> Monaco CE
> Times CE
> Helvetica CE
> Courier CE
> ÉqÉâÉMÉmäpÉS Pro W6
> ÉqÉâÉMÉmäpÉS Pro W3
> ÉqÉâÉMÉmä€ÉS Pro W4
> ÉqÉâÉMÉmñæí© Pro W6
> ÉqÉâÉMÉmñæí© Pro W3
> ª™Œƒœ???
> ÉqÉâÉMÉmäpÉS Std W8
> Geeza Pro Bold
> Lucida Grande CE
>
> Lines 6 through 12 show as characters above the 159 character range  
> and are not readable on my English setup here.  I assume that the  
> fonts on those lines are unicode.

Try this, Garrett:

on mouseUp
   put empty into fld "fontList"
   repeat with i = 1 to number of lines in the fontNames
     put uniencode(line i of the fontNames,"Japanese") & uniencode
(cr,"ANSI") after fld "fontList"
   end repeat
   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the textFont  
of fld "fontList","Japanese"
end mouseUp

This gets it *mostly* right, I think.

Devin


Devin Asay
Humanities Technology and Research Support Center
Brigham Young University

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Unicode Font List (Was Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic)

Devin Asay
I'm in obsessive mode with unicode. Here's the new and improved version:

on mouseUp
   put empty into fld "fontList"
   put the fontNames into fNames
   sort lines of fNames by word 1 of each
   put fnames
   repeat for each line tLine in fNames
     if char 1 of tLine is "#" then
       put uniencode(tLine,"Korean") & uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after fld  
"fontList"
     else
       put uniencode(tLine,"Japanese") & uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after  
fld "fontList"
     end if
   end repeat
   delete char -2 to -1 of fld "fontList"
   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the textFont  
of fld "fontList","Japanese"
   set the scroll of fld "fontList" to 0
end mouseUp

There still may be some problems, but since I can't read Chinese or  
Japanese, I have to trust that those font names came out properly.

On Mar 8, 2006, at 3:26 PM, Devin Asay wrote:

> on mouseUp
>   put empty into fld "fontList"
>   repeat with i = 1 to number of lines in the fontNames
>     put uniencode(line i of the fontNames,"Japanese") & uniencode
> (cr,"ANSI") after fld "fontList"
>   end repeat
>   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the  
> textFont of fld "fontList","Japanese"
> end mouseUp
>
> This gets it *mostly* right, I think.

Devin Asay
Humanities Technology and Research Support Center
Brigham Young University

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Re: Unicode Font List (Was Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic)

Garrett Hylltun-2
But isn't it just easier to filter out the unicode fonts and just list
the ANSI fonts like I did in my original post?

I'm just not sure of the need to actually list the unicode fonts, unless
you're providing support in a program for these languages.

-Garrett

Devin Asay wrote:

> I'm in obsessive mode with unicode. Here's the new and improved version:
>
> on mouseUp
>   put empty into fld "fontList"
>   put the fontNames into fNames
>   sort lines of fNames by word 1 of each
>   put fnames
>   repeat for each line tLine in fNames
>     if char 1 of tLine is "#" then
>       put uniencode(tLine,"Korean") & uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after fld
> "fontList"
>     else
>       put uniencode(tLine,"Japanese") & uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after fld
> "fontList"
>     end if
>   end repeat
>   delete char -2 to -1 of fld "fontList"
>   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the textFont of
> fld "fontList","Japanese"
>   set the scroll of fld "fontList" to 0
> end mouseUp
>
> There still may be some problems, but since I can't read Chinese or
> Japanese, I have to trust that those font names came out properly.
>
> On Mar 8, 2006, at 3:26 PM, Devin Asay wrote:
>
>> on mouseUp
>>   put empty into fld "fontList"
>>   repeat with i = 1 to number of lines in the fontNames
>>     put uniencode(line i of the fontNames,"Japanese") &
>> uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after fld "fontList"
>>   end repeat
>>   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the textFont
>> of fld "fontList","Japanese"
>> end mouseUp
>>
>> This gets it *mostly* right, I think.
>
> Devin Asay
> Humanities Technology and Research Support Center
> Brigham Young University
>
> _______________________________________________
> use-revolution mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your
> subscription preferences:
> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-revolution
>

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Re: Unicode Font List (Was Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic)

Devin Asay

On Mar 8, 2006, at 5:17 PM, Garrett Hylltun wrote:

> But isn't it just easier to filter out the unicode fonts and just  
> list the ANSI fonts like I did in my original post?
>
> I'm just not sure of the need to actually list the unicode fonts,  
> unless you're providing support in a program for these languages.

You're probably right, although support for unicode fonts in Rev  
fields is free, since Rev just leverages the OS's unicode  
capabilities. Besides, rendering the font names in unicode was a  
challenge that had taken on a life of its own. It had to be beaten. ;-)

Now I can go back to whatever productive work I was doing before.

Devin

Devin Asay
Humanities Technology and Research Support Center
Brigham Young University

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Re: Unicode Font List (Was Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic)

Devin Asay
In reply to this post by Devin Asay
Okay, this is the FINAL final version. I've been programming in  
Revolution for almost five years, and today is the first time I've  
noticed the fontLanguage function. I love this language!

on mouseUp
   put empty into fld "fontList"
   put the fontNames into fNames
   sort lines of fNames by word 1 of each
   put fnames
   repeat for each line tLine in fNames
     put uniencode(tLine,the fontlanguage of tLine) & uniencode
(cr,"ANSI") after fld "fontList"
   end repeat
   delete char -2 to -1 of fld "fontList"
   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the textFont  
of fld "fontList","Unicode"
   set the scroll of fld "fontList" to 0
end mouseUp

I promise I'm done now.

Devin

On Mar 8, 2006, at 5:09 PM, Devin Asay wrote:

> I'm in obsessive mode with unicode. Here's the new and improved  
> version:
>
> on mouseUp
>   put empty into fld "fontList"
>   put the fontNames into fNames
>   sort lines of fNames by word 1 of each
>   put fnames
>   repeat for each line tLine in fNames
>     if char 1 of tLine is "#" then
>       put uniencode(tLine,"Korean") & uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after  
> fld "fontList"
>     else
>       put uniencode(tLine,"Japanese") & uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after  
> fld "fontList"
>     end if
>   end repeat
>   delete char -2 to -1 of fld "fontList"
>   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the  
> textFont of fld "fontList","Japanese"
>   set the scroll of fld "fontList" to 0
> end mouseUp

<snip>

Devin Asay
Humanities Technology and Research Support Center
Brigham Young University

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Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic

Bob Warren-3
In reply to this post by Haitham Abdulla
Haitham wrote:

 >Question (6):

 >When we want to produce the program (or application) that is created by
 >Revolution, we can produce it as EXE file (in windows). But what if we
 >need to make some kind of Installation or Setup? Can we do it?

 >What about if the users want to uninstall our program (or software)?
 >Can they?

------------------------------------------------------------------
For a demo INNO setup of a Rev standalone, navigate to:-

http://www.howsoft.com/runrev/downloads/

- and download the file:

Picture Chooser Widget for Windows XP or 2000_setup.exe

It includes an uninstall.

Cheers,
Bob Warren

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Re: Unicode Font List (Was Re: Revolution vs Visual Basic)

Richard Gaskin
In reply to this post by Devin Asay
Devin Asay wrote:

> Okay, this is the FINAL final version. I've been programming in
> Revolution for almost five years, and today is the first time I've
> noticed the fontLanguage function. I love this language!
>
> on mouseUp
>   put empty into fld "fontList"
>   put the fontNames into fNames
>   sort lines of fNames by word 1 of each
>   put fnames
>   repeat for each line tLine in fNames
>     put uniencode(tLine,the fontlanguage of tLine) &
> uniencode(cr,"ANSI") after fld "fontList"
>   end repeat
>   delete char -2 to -1 of fld "fontList"
>   set the textFont of line 1 to -1 of fld "fontList" to the textFont of
> fld "fontList","Unicode"
>   set the scroll of fld "fontList" to 0
> end mouseUp
>

Good work.  Now what do we do to get a Font menu to display the font
names correctly?

--
  Richard Gaskin
  Managing Editor, revJournal
  _______________________________________________________
  Rev tips, tutorials and more: http://www.revJournal.com
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Re: Font Dialog Box

Garrett Hylltun-2
In reply to this post by Chipp Walters
Based on some of my own code and code shared by Chipp Walters, I put
together a font dialog that removes unicode fonts from the list, and
then represents each font in it's own font in the list.

Uploaded to the "user spaces" as "Stack:  fontDialogBasic" and "Title:
Basic font dialog example"

If you have problems using the "user spaces", download from here:
http://www.paraboliclogic.com/misc/fontDialogBasic.rev

Thanks Chipp for code that started this.  :-)

-Garrett
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