Quantcast

Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
10 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

Jim Schaubeck-3
So the revlet concept is not getting any more attention and revserver is great if you know 5 other programming languages to get it right.

I invested in livecode because of its web presence (actually it was the sales pitch of web apps that won me over). But I have officially given up on livecodesrevlet support.  Where does a livecode only person go from here if they want to be on the web?


Where does livecode sit with the web?  Revsever and all of it's simplicity might be the right answer for most guru's on this list but I'm 100% livecode...I don't have time to learn the other 5 languages?

 

                                                                                                                                                        
  Jim Schaubeck                                       [hidden email]/ 714.321.4499
_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

Andre Alves Garzia
Jim,

I don't want to sound pessimistic but what I am going to tell is good
advise on my opinion. Keep in mind it is my opinion only.

Revlets were never a good option for mass deployment because it is hard to
get the users to install a plugin. If you were working on some vertical
market such as education or internal enterprise apps, then you could force
your users to install the plugin but even so it is not guaranteed.

The only correct and safe way to be on the web is by using HTML, CSS and
Javascript. It may sound complicated but it is not. If it was there would
not be millions of web developers out there. Assembler is complicated,
parallel programming is complicated, web is easy.

Learning the web ways is a good amount of work but it is not hard work, it
is just tedious. All those fancy stuff such as Ruby On Rails, RevServer,
PHP, they are just generating HTML, CSS and Javascript. Of course they do
server side processing but that is business logic and not web per se.

I don't know how much of HTML/CSS/JS you know, so I will give gradual
advise. The first things are for someone that never saw the web from a
developer point of view. The stuff after that is for those that already
know how the web works at a glance and the last section is some advanced
stuff.

====================
 Never Saw HTML Before
====================

Try to join one of Mozilla learning initiatives. Some of their learning
stuff is targeted at teens but I think we can all handle it.

First, to get you curious, check out hacksaurus at
http://www.hackasaurus.org/en-US/ complete their getting started tutorial.
This will get you to replace some HTML content on the fly. It is fun and
gets you motivated. Depending on where you are, you may want to join some
Mozilla Webmaker event, find more about it at
https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/webmaker/

If that got you motivated, then you can grab some books that will help you
get started. HTML has many versions, if you're starting now, you should
learn HTML5 from the beginning.

The book "HTML5: The Missing Manual" should give you a basic understanding
on HTML and a cursory glance at CSS and Javascript:
http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920018001.do they also have "CSS: The
Missing Manual" available at
http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596802455.do?green=E18B58FD-1201-54EB-B5DF-813E55C008EF&intcmp=af-mybuy-9780596802455.IP

These are introductory books, I haven't read them but a friend of mine
really enjoyed them so I am quoting them.

====================
 Already understand about
 HTML, CSS, JS
 but don't want to use it
====================

The web is the platform. It is available everywhere and it is not going
away. Learning how to use it will pay off many times.

Learn more about the following libraries/frameworks
JQuery: the most popular javascript library out there at
http://www.jquery.com
Enyo JS: A personal favorite at http://www.enyojs.com build web
applications from Javascript without the need to write HTML and CSS.

The Pragmatic Bookshelf, O'Reilly, Apress and Packit have great web related
books. No matter what you choose, don't forget to read "Javascript: The
Good Parts" by David Crockford, great read.

==========
  Conclusion
==========

With RevServer you can work your business logic at the server end but you
still need to use web technologies to display your app. Automatic solutions
that deploy to the web are often inferior than hand crafted code. With just
a little HTML,CSS and JS you can create beautiful web apps backed by
RevServer that will be available everywhere the web is which means Desktop
and Mobile for all OS you can think of.

I've once built a little stack that would convert a stack to a web version
of it. It actually worked but the performance was bad and lots of bugs
could be introduced fairly easy if your stack was not coded wisely. In the
end, I noticed that I lost more time debugging my stack gizmo than I would
use to write the HTML stuff in the first place.

HTML may be boring but CSS and Javascript are great. I wish LiveCode had
anything similar to CSS. It would solve lots of layout issues and would
make skinning your app easy. Javascript is a great language with very
powerful features. It is my second favorite language and I am never tired
of the new stuff that is coming out for it.

LiveCode is great and my favorite language. You can use LC to create
awesome tools to help you code your web app. You can use RevServer to build
your server side code. No matter what you do, the web can help and enhance
your software.

Don't forget to install firebug on your firefox installation it is the best
web development aid available! ( http://www.getfirebug.com ).





On Fri, May 25, 2012 at 1:05 AM, Jim Schaubeck <[hidden email]>wrote:

> So the revlet concept is not getting any more attention and revserver is
> great if you know 5 other programming languages to get it right.
>
> I invested in livecode because of its web presence (actually it was the
> sales pitch of web apps that won me over). But I have officially given up
> on livecodesrevlet support.  Where does a livecode only person go from here
> if they want to be on the web?
>
>
> Where does livecode sit with the web?  Revsever and all of it's simplicity
> might be the right answer for most guru's on this list but I'm 100%
> livecode...I don't have time to learn the other 5 languages?
>
>
>
>
>
>   Jim Schaubeck
> [hidden email]/ 714.321.4499
> _______________________________________________
> use-livecode mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your
> subscription preferences:
> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
>



--
http://www.andregarzia.com -- All We Do Is Code.
http://fon.nu -- minimalist url shortening service.
_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

Stephen Barncard-4
In reply to this post by Jim Schaubeck-3
It's not that bad, Jim. Really.  Very few of us are gurus - just empowered
users, like you. The tools and the information are out there. Rev gave the
revlet a good shot, imho, and they had to drop it to concentrate on what is
more relevant for now. Andre's response says it all. One good thing is the
web is by design cross platform. Revlets required the maintenance of
several code bases and umpteen browsers, a nightmare, an impossible task.

Have you even tried reserver yet? Why not get a monthly account at on-rev
and mess around for a while. It's awesome.

On Thu, May 24, 2012 at 9:05 PM, Jim Schaubeck <[hidden email]>wrote:

> So the revlet concept is not getting any more attention and revserver is
> great if you know 5 other programming languages to get it right.
>
> I invested in livecode because of its web presence (actually it was the
> sales pitch of web apps that won me over). But I have officially given up
> on livecodesrevlet support.  Where does a livecode only person go from here
> if they want to be on the web?
>
>
> Where does livecode sit with the web?  Revsever and all of it's simplicity
> might be the right answer for most guru's on this list but I'm 100%
> livecode...I don't have time to learn the other 5 languages?
>
>
>
>
>
>   Jim Schaubeck
> [hidden email]/ 714.321.4499
> _______________________________________________
> use-livecode mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your
> subscription preferences:
> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
>



--



Stephen Barncard
San Francisco Ca. USA

more about sqb  <http://www.google.com/profiles/sbarncar>
_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

Pierre Sahores-2
In reply to this post by Andre Alves Garzia
What an informative great post, pedagogical and synthetic, to describe things, Andre ! Just want to add some details :

RevServer makes us able to program multi-users cloud enabled web and saas solutions in following the best standards we will ever get to code in avoiding sad proprietary languages, paradigms and systems.

RevServer expect a serious learning curve to makes us able to become 80% creative / 20% technical in about the solutions we deploy in using it to produce great HTML5/CSS3/Javascript anyware deployable solutions. On the other side, as soon as we master RevServer as the core engine of our creations, it becomes always more and more easy to use what it can outputs to the web browser or as a native or mobile web app.

Take the time to understand how HTML5 and CSS3 parse things is not a long way at all, just a little rebarbative before we get the logical elegance of them. About Javascript, while plain core JS coding can helps to understand the language, it's often interesting to choose a good precoded library, alike JQuery, Prototype or Mootools, and go head with it.

Just to hang up in being as concrete as possible in some practical tools and frameworks i use to make my day work easier :

LCServer, LCDesktop, LCiOS, LCAndroid, HTML5, JQuery libs, CSS3, CSSEdit2 (Mac only), TextMate (Mac only), TextWrangler (Mac only), GraphicConverter (Mac only), SnapNDrag (Mac only), Iconographer (Mac only),  yEd, CyberDuck (Mac only) ...

Test devices :

Windows XP to 7, OSX, iPad 1, iPod Touch, Samsung Galaxy S2 (Android 2.33), Motorola tablet (Android 3), MSIE6+, Safari, Chrome, Firefox ...


Le 25 mai 2012 à 07:02, Andre Garzia a écrit :

> Jim,
>
> I don't want to sound pessimistic but what I am going to tell is good
> advise on my opinion. Keep in mind it is my opinion only.
>
> Revlets were never a good option for mass deployment because it is hard to
> get the users to install a plugin. If you were working on some vertical
> market such as education or internal enterprise apps, then you could force
> your users to install the plugin but even so it is not guaranteed.
>
> The only correct and safe way to be on the web is by using HTML, CSS and
> Javascript. It may sound complicated but it is not. If it was there would
> not be millions of web developers out there. Assembler is complicated,
> parallel programming is complicated, web is easy.
>
> Learning the web ways is a good amount of work but it is not hard work, it
> is just tedious. All those fancy stuff such as Ruby On Rails, RevServer,
> PHP, they are just generating HTML, CSS and Javascript. Of course they do
> server side processing but that is business logic and not web per se.
>
> I don't know how much of HTML/CSS/JS you know, so I will give gradual
> advise. The first things are for someone that never saw the web from a
> developer point of view. The stuff after that is for those that already
> know how the web works at a glance and the last section is some advanced
> stuff.
>
> ====================
> Never Saw HTML Before
> ====================
>
> Try to join one of Mozilla learning initiatives. Some of their learning
> stuff is targeted at teens but I think we can all handle it.
>
> First, to get you curious, check out hacksaurus at
> http://www.hackasaurus.org/en-US/ complete their getting started tutorial.
> This will get you to replace some HTML content on the fly. It is fun and
> gets you motivated. Depending on where you are, you may want to join some
> Mozilla Webmaker event, find more about it at
> https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/webmaker/
>
> If that got you motivated, then you can grab some books that will help you
> get started. HTML has many versions, if you're starting now, you should
> learn HTML5 from the beginning.
>
> The book "HTML5: The Missing Manual" should give you a basic understanding
> on HTML and a cursory glance at CSS and Javascript:
> http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920018001.do they also have "CSS: The
> Missing Manual" available at
> http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596802455.do?green=E18B58FD-1201-54EB-B5DF-813E55C008EF&intcmp=af-mybuy-9780596802455.IP
>
> These are introductory books, I haven't read them but a friend of mine
> really enjoyed them so I am quoting them.
>
> ====================
> Already understand about
> HTML, CSS, JS
> but don't want to use it
> ====================
>
> The web is the platform. It is available everywhere and it is not going
> away. Learning how to use it will pay off many times.
>
> Learn more about the following libraries/frameworks
> JQuery: the most popular javascript library out there at
> http://www.jquery.com
> Enyo JS: A personal favorite at http://www.enyojs.com build web
> applications from Javascript without the need to write HTML and CSS.
>
> The Pragmatic Bookshelf, O'Reilly, Apress and Packit have great web related
> books. No matter what you choose, don't forget to read "Javascript: The
> Good Parts" by David Crockford, great read.
>
> ==========
>  Conclusion
> ==========
>
> With RevServer you can work your business logic at the server end but you
> still need to use web technologies to display your app. Automatic solutions
> that deploy to the web are often inferior than hand crafted code. With just
> a little HTML,CSS and JS you can create beautiful web apps backed by
> RevServer that will be available everywhere the web is which means Desktop
> and Mobile for all OS you can think of.
>
> I've once built a little stack that would convert a stack to a web version
> of it. It actually worked but the performance was bad and lots of bugs
> could be introduced fairly easy if your stack was not coded wisely. In the
> end, I noticed that I lost more time debugging my stack gizmo than I would
> use to write the HTML stuff in the first place.
>
> HTML may be boring but CSS and Javascript are great. I wish LiveCode had
> anything similar to CSS. It would solve lots of layout issues and would
> make skinning your app easy. Javascript is a great language with very
> powerful features. It is my second favorite language and I am never tired
> of the new stuff that is coming out for it.
>
> LiveCode is great and my favorite language. You can use LC to create
> awesome tools to help you code your web app. You can use RevServer to build
> your server side code. No matter what you do, the web can help and enhance
> your software.
>
> Don't forget to install firebug on your firefox installation it is the best
> web development aid available! ( http://www.getfirebug.com ).
>
>
>
>
>
> On Fri, May 25, 2012 at 1:05 AM, Jim Schaubeck <[hidden email]>wrote:
>
>> So the revlet concept is not getting any more attention and revserver is
>> great if you know 5 other programming languages to get it right.
>>
>> I invested in livecode because of its web presence (actually it was the
>> sales pitch of web apps that won me over). But I have officially given up
>> on livecodesrevlet support.  Where does a livecode only person go from here
>> if they want to be on the web?
>>
>>
>> Where does livecode sit with the web?  Revsever and all of it's simplicity
>> might be the right answer for most guru's on this list but I'm 100%
>> livecode...I don't have time to learn the other 5 languages?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>  Jim Schaubeck
>> [hidden email]/ 714.321.4499
>> _______________________________________________
>> use-livecode mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your
>> subscription preferences:
>> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
>>
>
>
>
> --
> http://www.andregarzia.com -- All We Do Is Code.
> http://fon.nu -- minimalist url shortening service.
> _______________________________________________
> use-livecode mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode

--
Pierre Sahores
mobile : 06 03 95 77 70
www.sahores-conseil.com


_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

Igor de Oliveira Couto-2
I am coming to LiveCode from a web development background. I must say, that my point of view may differ from what has been presented so far.

First, I find web programming quite enjoyable. I use a very, very powerful and little-known text editor called 'Sublime Text' (http://www.sublimetext.com/), which makes writing HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP and SQL quite enjoyable. Because web projects are usually rather complex, you often have to deal with other programmers, and because of that I have become quite comfortable with group-based version control systems - I use GitBox on the Mac, a beautifully simple front-end for Git - and have also leaned to programme using techniques like 'test-driven development'. This not only ensure a higher stability and quality in my code, but also help prove and document just how well your code works.

Unfortunately, there is no denying that web development IS a complex and ugly beast. You *are* dealing with a variety of languages, both on the client side, and on the server side. You deal with a variety of frameworks. And you have to use a variety of programming techniques, philosophies and approaches. Some of the frameworks worth mentioning:

ON THE SERVER
* SlimPHP (http://www.slimframework.com/) - makes it *super* easy to setup RESTful services and interfaces on your server
* RedBeanPHP (http://redbeanphp.com/) - an incredibly flexible and stupidly easy ORM framework which makes using your backend database a true pleasure

ON THE CLIENT
* LESS (http://lesscss.org/) - you will *never* look at css the same way again
* AngularJS (http://angularjs.org/) - there are, literally, hundreds of javascript frameworks out there that propose to be *the only one* you will ever need. IMHO, *this* is 'the one': funded by Google and based on JQuery, this is absolutely awesome, thoroughly documented and tested, can handle all your RESTful server communications and user interactivity, and can turn your HTML into an interface language.

Using all these different technologies *is* a challenge, but for me, that is not the problem.

For me, the main problem is that the BROWSER was never designed to be a platform for application development in the first place. It was meant to be only a content-delivery tool. We are using all these tools to try to make the browser 'turn' into a platform for delivering 'desktop-quality' app - and, honestly, the browser can get close to it, but it is just not the same. Just because you *can* programme a solution as a web app, does not mean that it is the best solution. In my experience, it very rarely is. There *are* problems, always, even if you follow all the 'best-practices'. The common problems - which are well documented - include:

-- incompatibilities between platforms, between browsers and between browser versions - see http://caniuse.com/.
-- incompatibilities between different frameworks and technologies used in the same project - I typically use 3 to 5 frameworks in every project, sometimes more. There is always a breaking problem that pops up somewhere, whenever a framework needs to be updated with an 'urgent security fix'.
-- many security issues that arise if you have exposed business logic code on the client-side
-- many responsiveness and speed issues that arise if you have too much of the interface logic on the server-side
-- extremely fast technological evolution, which requires constant updating and refactoring

I have found that, although I have managed to design and produce some beautiful and functional web sites and apps - which have left me feeling quite fulfilled professionally - the truth is, that in many, many cases the client would have been better served by having a desktop or iPad/iPhone app instead.

See, I don't want to get into LiveCode so I can produce web apps. I want to get into LiveCode so I can at least *reduce* the number of web apps I produce, because I honestly feel that they are a poor solution to many of the problems that the clients want to use them to address.

Case in point: a client needs to overhaul their admin system. They are expanding overseas, and a client-management system that used to be lan-based, in-house, now needs to be accessed by their branches overseas as well. They have put some of the data already on a MySQL server (a shared host), and a web developer has already started to create pages that access some of the database information. So, they are basically going to expand their website, so that it will include a full-blown admin system for the entire company. In theory, people will be able to login from anywhere, with whatever device they have, and have full use of their client management system. From previous experience, I know this is going to be a nightmare.

I have been trying out LiveCode for about 3 weeks now, and I think we may be able to offer an alternative to the client, with LiveCode. The client can still keep their database on the shared host, but instead of accessing it with web browsers, we can develop desktop and iOS apps that will access this data remotely. Even on the server side, instead of using PHP or other languages, we can use LiveCode to access the database and dish out the data via a RESTful interface (I believe I've seen some server-side code from the amazing Andre Garzia that does that). Not only would this be a lot less complex to programme and maintain, but IMHO, it would end up being more *secure* for the client.

With this in mind, I have to agree with the original poster, that I do not really see much point in 'Revlets' - because what attracts me most about LiveCode is precisely the fact that I can might be able to get my clients to move their business processes *away* from the browser, and back into a desktop (or an iPad) app, where they belong. I believe browsers will keep evolving, and will become better and better at content delivery, but I don't think my browser will be the development platform of the future. It seems to me that LiveCode already offers a simpler, more manageable and 'sane' way to build apps that offer the same flexibility of web apps, but simpler, easier to develop and manage, and providing results that are often more secure and offer better interactivity to the user.

I hope this info may help some.

Kind regards to all,

--
Igor Couto
Sydney, Australia


_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

Bernard Devlin-2
Bravo, Igor.  This is exactly how I see it.  But thanks to Andre and
the others for making really good points.  (I'd never heard of
AngularJS, so I'm going to look into it).

I'd bet 99.99% of developers have never heard of Livecode.  Without a
massive advertising campaign, I don't see them galloping in here.

If you want to provide something that requires zero installation
resistance, then the web is your platform.

Once you get over that installation resistance, then Livecode shines.
And what we are seeing with the apps markets on the various mobile
devices is that end-users are getting over the installation
resistance.

Bernard

On Fri, May 25, 2012 at 10:14 AM, Igor de Oliveira Couto
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Unfortunately, there is no denying that web development IS a complex and ugly beast. You *are* dealing with a variety of languages, both on the client side, and on the server side. You deal with a variety of frameworks. And you have to use a variety of programming techniques, philosophies and approaches. Some of the frameworks worth mentioning:
[...]
> For me, the main problem is that the BROWSER was never designed to be a platform for application development in the first place. It was meant to be only a content-delivery tool. We are using all these tools to try to make the browser 'turn' into a platform for delivering 'desktop-quality' app - and, honestly, the browser can get close to it, but it is just not the same. Just because you *can* programme a solution as a web app, does not mean that it is the best solution. In my experience, it very rarely is. There *are* problems, always, even if you follow all the 'best-practices'.
[...]
> See, I don't want to get into LiveCode so I can produce web apps. I want to get into LiveCode so I can at least *reduce* the number of web apps I produce, because I honestly feel that they are a poor solution to many of the problems that the clients want to use them to address.
[...]
> With this in mind, I have to agree with the original poster, that I do not really see much point in 'Revlets' - because what attracts me most about LiveCode is precisely the fact that I can might be able to get my clients to move their business processes *away* from the browser, and back into a desktop (or an iPad) app, where they belong. I believe browsers will keep evolving, and will become better and better at content delivery, but I don't think my browser will be the development platform of the future. It seems to me that LiveCode already offers a simpler, more manageable and 'sane' way to build apps that offer the same flexibility of web apps, but simpler, easier to develop and manage, and providing results that are often more secure and offer better interactivity to the user.

_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

Richard Gaskin
In reply to this post by Igor de Oliveira Couto-2
Igor de Oliveira Couto wrote:

 > I have been trying out LiveCode for about 3 weeks now, and I think
 > we may be able to offer an alternative to the client, with LiveCode.
 > The client can still keep their database on the shared host, but
 > instead of accessing it with web browsers, we can develop desktop
 > and iOS apps that will access this data remotely.

Well said.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, the popularity of the app
stores for mobile platforms makes it pretty clear that Web-connected
native apps can be a valuable option to meet customers' needs.

This is as true for the desktop as it is for mobile.

If a customer needs a truly browser-native experience, any discussion of
a solution dependent on installing a proprietary compiled plugin
probably hasn't been thought through well enough for the customer to
realize that it's not what really they're asking for.

In those cases where it will indeed meet their needs, in which their IT
staff is sufficiently comfortable allowing users to install the LC
engine as a plugin, they're just as likely to consider a native app
which provides all those benefits and more: they still download stacks
over HTTP and those stacks can be updated at any time (see RevNet in
your Plugins menu as one modest example), but they also get a UI
dedicated for the workflow the app supports, and have options for
offline storage and workflows beyond anything any browser can provide.

Those cases where local installation isn't acceptable at all, once the
implications of a plugin are realized it won't be a candidate either.
For those you're limited to what the browser carries with it, which
currently means HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

We've discussed many of the challenges of LiveCode->JavaScript
translation here many times, so I won't reiterate them here.

But there is another approach, opportunities available which can provide
significant benefit for perhaps a majority of the types of things that
are practical to deliver in a browser, and without waiting for anything
from RunRev - consider this proposal from 2006, inspired by the work
ToolBook did a decade before:

<http://lists.runrev.com/pipermail/use-livecode/2006-June/083956.html>

The scope of my current client work prevents me from managing such a
project, but having written a few LiveCode->HTML/JS translators for
specifics apps before I'd be happy to lend that experience to such an
effort if anyone else has time to lead it.

--
  Richard Gaskin
  Fourth World
  LiveCode training and consulting: http://www.fourthworld.com
  Webzine for LiveCode developers: http://www.LiveCodeJournal.com
  LiveCode Journal blog: http://LiveCodejournal.com/blog.irv

_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

slylabs13
In reply to this post by Andre Alves Garzia
Great article. I think a good way to describe Revserver is a web server that allows the use of LC code embedded in HTML. You can't ever get away from HTML of course. It's what browsers know and understand. I'm with Jim in that learning new languages always puts me off, but I understand that it's necessary to accomplish what Jim is after.

I have a smattering of understanding about HTML, but I am always worried about security and how to accomplish it. We had a web dev once who demonstrated he could hack into just about anybody's PHP and get their logins because almost nobody knew how to secure their web sites from this kind of attack. He used to steal other people's code and modify it to make it better for his own uses. Now he doesn't do that anymore. Other people are trying to steal HIS code. :-)

Bob



_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

slylabs13
In reply to this post by Igor de Oliveira Couto-2
It has always seemed to me that the process of enhancing browsers has resulted in eventually breaking them. Remember when Safari was the most stable browser available for the Mac? Then they started enhancing it. It may be in a good state now, but I can remember being forced to use Firefox because something broke in Safari that prevented me from doing a common task.

Bob


On May 25, 2012, at 2:14 AM, Igor de Oliveira Couto wrote:

> I believe browsers will keep evolving, and will become better and better at content delivery, but I don't think my browser will be the development platform of the future.


_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Webifying livecode is a real mystery to me

slylabs13
In reply to this post by Richard Gaskin
We may find ourselves coming full circle, where companies say to us as developers, "The web app we had designed for us is ok, but it lacks some features we simply cannot get from a web app. I need you to design a desktop app with mobile equivalents to do what our web app does, and then add these features."

Bob


On May 25, 2012, at 7:20 AM, Richard Gaskin wrote:

> Igor de Oliveira Couto wrote:
>
> > I have been trying out LiveCode for about 3 weeks now, and I think
> > we may be able to offer an alternative to the client, with LiveCode.
> > The client can still keep their database on the shared host, but
> > instead of accessing it with web browsers, we can develop desktop
> > and iOS apps that will access this data remotely.
>
> Well said.
>
> At the risk of sounding like a broken record, the popularity of the app stores for mobile platforms makes it pretty clear that Web-connected native apps can be a valuable option to meet customers' needs.


_______________________________________________
use-livecode mailing list
[hidden email]
Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription preferences:
http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
Loading...